FREE

Subscribe to the display technology news roundups. You can also post your own content in the open section.

Display Industry News Roundups
Delivered via email

Twitter

Entries in Jaguar Land Rover (5)

Wednesday
Jan302013

Jaguar Land Rover HMI Display Development

Technical Q&A with Lee Skrypchuk, Human Machine Interface Technical Specialist at Jaguar Land Rover

www.jaguarlandrover.com

DA: What does Jaguar Land Rover have in the works for HMI development?

Lee Skrypchuk: Jaguar Land Rover has a history of developing impressive display systems for the vehicle. Full TFT instrument cluster, Dual View and rotary shifter are a few examples of technologies that we have deployed within our vehicles over the last 5 years.

We are continuing to develop future innovations in this area and whilst I can't be specific on what they are, what I can say is that they will move on significantly and I expect a number of the innovations to hit the market in the next 5 years possibly another 5-10 key technologies in this space.


For more technical Q&A visit the interviews section.

Email jason@displayalliance.com to promote your expertise and be recognized as a Display Alliance contributor.


Wednesday
Jan302013

Impact of touch technology on HMI displays

Technical Q&A with Lee Skrypchuk, Human Machine Interface Technical Specialist at Jaguar Land Rover

www.jaguarlandrover.com

DA: What impact has touch technology had on HMI displays?

Lee Skrypchuk: Touch technology is a very important part of interface development, touch screen elements are becoming an integral part of the display system to the point where I can see them merging into 1 seamless component (currently they are 2).

People expect touch screen even when it is not there and this causes disappointment to the consumer. A number of different technologies will be used in the future but one significant challenge that automotive has to resolve is that of haptic feedback - to give the user knowledge that they have triggered a positive action, this is really in its infancy in automotive and thus I expect this will develop in the near future.


For more technical Q&A visit the interviews section.

Email jason@displayalliance.com to promote your expertise and be recognized as a Display Alliance contributor.


Wednesday
Jan302013

Automotive industry HMI displays

Technical Q&A with Lee Skrypchuk, Human Machine Interface Technical Specialist at Jaguar Land Rover

www.jaguarlandrover.com

DA: In the automotive industry, how have companies learned from bad user experiences and used those failures to improve HMI displays?

Lee Skrypchuk: It is difficult to cite one particular example. However, I think it is important that displays are thought of as part of a system and not as an individual component.

Automotive has differed from computing systems in that the display's intelligence and the intelligence of the system tends to be distributed around the car. This can cause issues in latency across the system which can cause issues with perceived lag in the display. It is important that visual data / behaviour is updated as quickly as possible in order to maintain a good feedback system.

One advantage of modern mobiles and tablets are that they give instant response to user input - this is not always the case in automotive because of the hardware involved - however I expect that this will move a significant amount in the near future.


For more technical Q&A visit the interviews section.

Email jason@displayalliance.com to promote your expertise and be recognized as a Display Alliance contributor.


Wednesday
Jan302013

What does an engineer take into consideration when developing an HMI display?

Technical Q&A with Lee Skrypchuk, Human Machine Interface Technical Specialist at Jaguar Land Rover

www.jaguarlandrover.com

DA: What does an engineer take into consideration when developing an HMI display?

Lee Skrypchuk: For automotive it is important to consider the application, there are a number of features and functions that require displayed information and the viewing conditions are different for each, therefore it is important to get the requirements right for each.

It is also critical that this information is not distracting to the driver. Visual information is well known to cause significant distraction if not managed correctly and that is why mobile phones are a bad comparison to make when comparing interfaces purely because of the safety aspect.

Other areas of consideration include, crash safety, lifetime (10 years +) and environmental requirements (thermal performance in particular) and robustness (vibration) but also we have to make them look good - it is expected, especially in the premium market that we develop vehicles that will stand out - this runs through from exterior and interior styling through to the HMI devices within the vehicle.


For more technical Q&A visit the interviews section.

Email jason@displayalliance.com to promote your expertise and be recognized as a Display Alliance contributor.


Wednesday
Jan302013

Where is HMI display technology right now and where is it heading?

Technical Q&A with Lee Skrypchuk, Human Machine Interface Technical Specialist at Jaguar Land Rover

www.jaguarlandrover.com

DA: Where is HMI display technology right now and where is it heading?

Lee Skrypchuk: In my field - Automotive HMI, display technology is lagging behind the explosion seen in the consumer markets. The level of performance being seen in mobile phones and tablets is a step change difference to where they were 5 years ago and this level is significantly ahead of where we are in automotive.

Despite saying this there is less of a need for these high resolution displays purely from a "customer need" perspective but there is definitely a "customer want" for higher resolution, impressive displays. The key differentiator that is holding back displays in the automobile is that of the environment. The harshness and variety of environmental extremes means that standard consumer display's can't be used, therefore specific development projects need to take place.

I expect that the increased resolution trend will eventually migrate across to cars, but this must not be done at the expense of performance and in particular brightness - which in a fixed position system is critical to ensure performance in all ambient lighting conditions, this is something that consumer devices are not particularly good at.

The fixed viewing conditions and position of the displays means that from an acuity perspective there is simply not a huge amount of need for higher resolution as we are, for screens of greater than 130 DPI, already past the threshold for pixel fusion. Flat panels are becoming more prevalent in all vehicles but especially the premium car market, I expect to see more innovative display solutions being involved and especially more integration with the features within the interior.


For more technical Q&A visit the interviews section.

Email jason@displayalliance.com to promote your expertise and be recognized as a Display Alliance contributor.