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Entries in HMD (5)

Wednesday
Aug012012

Microsoft's Google Glass rival

"Here's one crucial difference between Google's approach and Microsoft's: Google thinks the display should face your eyes, and Microsoft thinks the display should project outwards." via CNNMoney

 

Display Alliance is published by Mass Integrated Systems, Inc., a global display distributor. We supply display panels for Digital Signage, Industrial, Military, Medical, End-of-life, Projected Capacitive Touch (PCAP), Laptops, Tablets, and more. Call us for sourcing and purchasing: (978) 465-6190

Wednesday
Aug012012

Test validates functionality of Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System II/h

Image via Aviation News Portal

"The JHMCS II/h allows a pilot to aim sensors and weapons wherever he or she is looking, through the use of new head-tracking technology and a display projected onto the helmet's visor. Produced by Vision Systems International (VSI), this system provides significantly improved ergonomics and reliability, at lower cost, than VSI’s prior JHMCS system." via Defence Professionals

 

Display Alliance is published by Mass Integrated Systems, Inc., a global display distributor. We supply display panels for Digital Signage, Industrial, Military, Medical, End-of-life, Projected Capacitive Touch (PCAP), Laptops, Tablets, and more. Call us for sourcing and purchasing: (978) 465-6190

Tuesday
Jul312012

After Google, Apple plans to launch futuristic glasses

"The patent filed by Apple on January 20, 2011 reveals a new innovation by the firm that could be used to increase the pixel density of a digital display placed over someone''s eye through mechanical actuation and describes wearable video glasses that use a tiny battery, which could display video as clear as the iPhone 4S with its Retina Display." via Zeenews

Monday
Jul022012

Virtual Reality Helps Service Members Deal with PTSD

Image via DefenseNews

"Train the brain: It’s a recurring mantra for the training and simulation industry, but it has never been more pertinent than for veterans struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder. Adapting existing technology to clinical needs isn’t necessarily new — but it is picking up speed and a variety of options.

One of the rising stars is virtual reality, which is moving from game controllers and low-fi graphics to molded resin replicas of guns and goggles displaying first-rate worlds. There, troops can travel back to their traumatic events and work through the thoughts that still haunt them.

...

One therapeutic PTSD tool, the Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan program, is in place in close to 50 hospitals and clinics across the U.S. The system offers a variety of scenarios. With the smell of gunfire and body odor in the air, troops can drive along a desert road only to have their Humvee hit an improvised explosive device. Or they can walk the town as the call to prayer rings in their ears, passing a spice market only to hear gunfire break out. It will never replicate the traumatic event a service member had in the war zone, but it doesn’t have to.

“With virtual reality, you are limited by the technology,” said Michael Kramer, a clinical psychologist who uses the Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan program through VA. “You can’t re-create that exact occurrence, but you can help trigger a memory.”

...

Although increased graphics and options will certainly make the simulation more realistic, Rizzo emphasizes that the basis of the therapy is in the scientific research and results behind it. Exposure therapy works effectively, and the data are just starting to trickle in for virtual reality therapy.

...

PTSD tools are not constrained to a set of goggles or a head-mounted display; several tools are available through virtual worlds accessed via the Internet. SimCoach is an interactive program with four different avatars that users can talk with about PTSD. The coach can give the user an assessment, suggest local care facilities, give information about the disorder, and offer an anonymous place to talk.

...

Virtual reality programs — whether they rely on goggles or laptops — all face the same struggle when trying to provide proper levels of realism. Users are aware that they are looking at something computer-generated, and programs that try for complete realism may tumble instead into the “uncanny valley” — where not-quite-perfect human avatars can be off-putting.

...

However, for ease of access, nothing beats the mobile device already sitting in many service members’ pockets. Using a mobile app is private, relatively anonymous, free and totally at the service member’s convenience.

...

Within the next year, researchers should accumulate mountains of data about how the more technological approach to PTSD is working, which will either confirm or refute the anecdotal evidence of success. Despite the different approaches, all attempt to change how veterans think about their traumatic experiences, rewiring their brains so that they learn to cope with triggers and responses to stress. The knowledge gained from treating and training veterans may eventually help those with PTSD from other traumatic events, such as rape or abuse.

“The driver is war,” Rizzo says. “War sucks. But every damn war has driven innovation and advances in medicine, rehabilitation and mental health.”" via DefenseNews

Monday
Jun252012

Canon to Launch Augmented-Reality Platform Based on Head-Mounted Displays 

Image via Canon

"The virtual images are shown to users using two tiny display panels that sit just above the eyes. The images from the display panels are carefully aligned with user's point of view, to keep the virtual world aligned with the real one.

This camera-display combination allows the platform to display virtual items and shapes as though they are being viewed at the correct size and angle, even as users change position.

The company says it will begin sales of the platform from late June in Japan, and that Canon's foreign marketing subsidiaries may sell it abroad as well in the future. Canon will initially target the manufacturing industry, pitching the system as a way to look at new products before they are manufactured or test proposed factory layouts. It is also considering selling the system to companies that reform the interiors of buildings or for use in simulating surgical procedures." via PCWorld